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How to dry mint using three smart drying methods

You successfully cultivated your own mint plant in your garden and used the fresh herb in teas, alcoholic drinks, sauces, salads, and mouthwatering desserts. 

Now you want to enjoy its refreshing flavor and aroma for longer by drying this aromatic herb. 

If you’re wondering how to dry mint at home, you’re in for a treat! Master the art of drying your favorite herb using these three smart methods in this walkthrough guide, plus unlock the best way to store dried mint!

What is mint

Mint is an aromatic herb that’s popular for its refreshing bright flavor and scent. It’s used to flavor many drinks and dishes, from teas to desserts, and is popular in Middle Eastern cuisine. There’s a wide variety too—some of which are apple mint, orange mint, chocolate mint, and the most often used in beverages and culinary fields—the spearmint (mentha spicata).

Growing mint at home isn’t too hard—it doesn’t need much watering and the herb can make it through most seasons if you cultivate it inside. Also, cultivating your own is more economical, fresher, and more handy than purchasing those dried or fresh herbs in the grocery store.

Various ways to dry mint

Drying mint doesn’t mean preventing them from spoilage; it’s a great way to maintain the flavor of the herb so you can enjoy it all year long. There are three ways to dry mint—you can either dry them in an oven, in a food dehydrator or using the air-dry method.

How to air dry mint

The hang-drying method is a traditional way to air dry any fresh herbs. To make it work, all you need is to make sure the herbs are placed in areas with very low humidity or during dry, warm days. 

Follow these easy steps to learn how to dry mint using the bunch or drying method.

    1. Brush any dirt from leaves or wash and gently pat dry. Discard discolored mint.
    2. Group at least four or five stems of mint and tie them together with a rubber band around the end. 
    3. Place the bundles inside a brown paper bag. This avoids the exposure of the leaves to molds, dust, and sunlight. 
    4. Poke holes all over the sides of the bag using a pen to allow the air to flow in and out. 
    5. Hang the bag upside down inside a room that has air circulation. Make sure not to hang them above the stove or in a room that can affect the herb’s flavor.  It takes one to two weeks to fully dry the leaves.
    6. Store them in an airtight container or glass herb jar.

Pro tip: Because it can take weeks to air dry, if you’re in a hurry for dried mint, it’s better to use other drying alternatives like the oven method or dehydrating method.

How to dry mint in the oven

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    1. Brush off any visible dirt or wash and pat dry gently with a clean cloth.
    2. Preheat the oven to 180 °F.
    3. Remove the leaves from the stems or leave them as is. 
    4. Place mint leaves on a baking sheet in a single layer, making sure they don’t overlap or the leaves underneath will not dry and can become moldy.
    5. Let the herbs dry for a few hours until it’s completely dry. 
    6. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and let the dried mint cool down COMPLETELY for about an hour.
    7. Store them in an airtight container or glass herb jar. We found these jars to be versatile and visually appealing. 

Pro tip: Dry small batches of mint at a time to avoid overlap. Use one rack in the oven so the sheet heats evenly.

How to dry mint in the food dehydrator

Planning to dry tons of mint? Pick the dehydrating method! Like the oven drying technique, drying mint in the food dehydrator is also faster than the traditional hang-drying method.

    1. Brush off any visible dirt or wash and gently pat dry the mint.
    2. Remove the leaves from stems. Discard anything that’s discolored.
    3. Place the leaves on the drying screens. Make sure to create a space between them for air to circulate.
    4. Place the screen or tray in the dehydrator and set it at 105°F. Wait until completely dried.
    5. Remove the tray and let it cool.
    6. Store the dried mint leaves in an airtight container or glass herb jar.

Pro tip: Make sure to let your newly dried leaves cool for a few minutes because residual heat can cause condensation in the container that might spoil the mint.

Look for 8 of the best herbs that you can grow at home here.

What is the best way to dry mint?

My answer is it depends. Choosing a drying method for your mint should be based on your needs. I recommend using the oven or dehydrating method if you’re in a hurry and pick the hang-drying technique if you have enough space at home or you’re comfortable with the traditional procedure.

Should I leave dried mint leaves whole or crumble them?

You can either choose to leave the mint leaves whole or crumble them. But I suggest keeping them whole and adding them straight to the herb glass jar (once they are completely cool, otherwise water will condense inside the jar and cause the leaves to rot) after the drying process as it helps preserve the herb’s aroma and flavor. I recommend crumbling the leaves at the time you use them for your drinks or dishes.

How to store dried mint

Now that you’ve dried your mint, it’s time to put the aromatic herb in a storage container. I suggest putting the leaves in a herb glass jar or airtight container and leave them whole to preserve their scent and flavor profile. Store them in your kitchen cupboard, preferably away from the heat.

How long does dried mint last?

Generally, your dried mint leaves last for about one to three years when properly stored. They start to lose flavor and bright scent after about six months. So make sure to keep them in containers with tight-fitting lids like airtight containers or herb glass jars.

The bottom line

Growing mint is an easy task, and so is the drying process! But before you proceed to dry the herbs, ensure you leave time to go over the tips and tricks in this guide so you’ll be able to dry them with ease. After that, you can now select the suitable method for you then maintain the best flavor and aroma of your favorite aromatic herb at home!

BONUS: For an aromatic pick-me-up, make a potpourri! Add a Tablespoon of your dried and crumbled mint with a whole lemon (juice and slices) to two quarts of water. Add to a heavy pot and keep on your stove’s lowest setting for three hours to fill your home with a fresh scent without chemicals and preservatives. Don’t let the pot run out of water while still on the heat.

How to air dry mint

How to air dry mint

Learn how to dry mint using the bunch or hang-drying method so you can enjoy your favorite aromatic herb all year round.

Ingredients

  • Fresh mint
  • Brown paper bag (don’t use plastic bags since water condenses on the inside)
  • Pen
  • Rubber band or twist tie
  • Airtight container or glass herb jar

Instructions

  1. Brush off visible dirt with your fingers or wash and gently pat dry with a clean cloth.
  2. Bundle at least four or five stems of mint and tie them together with a tie around the end. 
  3. Place the bundles inside a brown paper bag. This avoids the exposure of the leaves to molds, dust, and sunlight. 
  4. Poke holes all over the sides of the bag using a pen to allow the air to flow in and out. 
  5. Hang the bag upside down inside a room that has air circulation. Make sure not to hang them above the stove or in a room that can affect the herb's flavor. 
  6. Store the dried stems and leaves whole in an airtight container or glass herb jar. 🌿

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